Butler Mission Week 2019

The Second Annual Butler Mission Week (BMW) celebrated the weeklong event with a free community Block Party on Friday, July 19th.  The Block Party was held on the lawn of Susan B. Allen Memorial Hospital.   

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The weeklong event ended with a Block Party on the lawn of Susan B. Allen Memorial Hospital.

Over 227 volunteers worked in multiple shifts each day throughout the week, following the biblical command “Love Thy Neighbor” .  They did so by participating in community service projects and intentional acts of kindness. According to program director, Andrea Van Auken, the goal was simple, to “Take care of the town we live in.” 

The volunteers participated in a variety of events throughout the week and impacted over 90,000 people in Butler County.  The week also served as a mission week for the middle school and high school kids who stayed at the church all week. 

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Butler Mission Week volunteers served multiple organizations throughout the week. 
Pictured here at Drums Across Kansas, from left to right, are Christian Price, Dewey Price and April White.

BMW was conceived of by the Co-Pastors of Hope Covenant Church.  The church’s vision is to “Be Known, Belong, Be Love. We believe it is important for people to be known by God through intentional discipleship, to belong to a community through authentic relationships, and to be love through serving others.

 

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NLRB Hears Allegations Against SBA

The National Labor Relations Board (NLRB) held a hearing at the Butler County Judicial Center involving charges made against Susan B. Allen Memorial Hospital by former employees, Lori R. Dashner and Gay Kimble.

 The NLRB was created in 1935 by Congress to administer the National Labor Relations Act (NLRA). The NLRA is the law that governs relations between labor unions and employers whose operations involve interstate commerce. 

Dashner and Kimble, who were terminated within an hour of one another, claim they were illegally terminated and they were fired as a result of “Concerted Activities.” 

Alan Rupe, attorney for Susan B. Allen Memorial Hospital (SBA), noted in his opening statements that some of the employee activities fell under protected concerted activities.  However, he added the employees were not terminated for those activities. 

In an official statement released by SBA, they contend the employees were terminated as a result of safety and security breaches.  

“Susan B. Allen Memorial Hospital maintains that it operated within the guidelines of the National Labor Relations Act. All personnel decisions are made with the intent to protect the safety of the patients and employees at SBA.”

According to the NLRB, under the protection of concerted activities, employees have the right to act with co-workers to address work-related issues in many ways.  Examples include: talking with one or more co-workers about wages and benefits or other working conditions, circulating a petition asking for better hours, participating in a concerted refusal to work in unsafe conditions, openly talking about pay and benefits, and joining with co-workers to talk directly to the employer, to a government agency, or to the media about problems in [the] workplace. [An] employer cannot discharge, discipline, or threaten for, or coercively question about, protected concerted activity.  A single employee may also engage in protected concerted activity if he or she is acting on the authority of other employees, bringing group complaints to the employer’s attention, trying to induce group action, or seeking to prepare for group action. However, [employees] can lose protection by saying or doing something egregiously offensive or knowingly and maliciously false, or by publicly disparaging [the] employer’s products or services without relating complaints to any labor controversy.

The complaints filed by Dashner and Kimble cited Section 8(a)(1) of the National Labor Relations Act which makes it an unfair labor practice for an employer “to interfere with, restrain, or coerce employees in the exercise of the rights guaranteed in Section 7” 

Employers are restricted from the following actions:

  • Threaten employees with adverse consequences, such as closing the workplace, loss of benefits, or more onerous working conditions, if they support a union, engage in union activity, or select a union to represent them.
  • Threaten employees with adverse consequences if they engage in protected, concerted activity. (Activity is “concerted” if it is engaged in with or on the authority of other employees, not solely by and on behalf of the employee himself. It includes circumstances where a single employee seeks to initiate, induce, or prepare for group action, as well as where an employee brings a group complaint to the attention of management. Activity is “protected” if it concerns employees’ interests as employees. An employee engaged in otherwise protected, concerted activity may lose the Act’s protection through misconduct.)
  • Promise employees benefits if they reject the union.
  • Imply a promise of benefits by soliciting grievances from employees during a union organizing campaign. (However, if you regularly solicited employee grievances before the campaign began, you may continue that practice unchanged.)
  • Confer benefits on employees during a union organizing campaign to induce employees to vote against the union.
  • Withhold changes in wages or benefits during a union organizing campaign that would have been made had the union not been on the scene, unless you make clear to employees that the change will occur whether or not they select the union, and that your sole purpose in postponing the change is to avoid any appearance of trying to influence the outcome of the election.
  • Coercively question employees about their own or coworkers’ union activities or sympathies. (Whether questioning is coercive and therefore unlawful depends on the relevant circumstances, including who asks the questions, where, and how; what information is sought; whether the questioned employee is an open and active union supporter; and whether the questioning occurs in a context of other unfair labor practices.)
  • Prohibit employees from talking about the union during working time, if you permit them to talk about other non-work-related subjects.
  • Poll your employees to determine the extent of their support for a union, unless you comply with certain safeguards. You must not have engaged in unfair labor practices or otherwise created a coercive atmosphere. In addition, you must (1) communicate to employees that the purpose of the poll is to determine whether the union enjoys majority support (and that must, in truth, be your purpose); (2) give employees assurances against reprisal; and (3) conduct the poll by secret ballot.
  • Spy on employees’ union activities. (“Spying” means doing something out of the ordinary to observe the activity. Seeing open union activity in workplace areas frequented by supervisors is not “spying.”)
  • Create the impression that you are spying on employees’ union activities.
  • Photograph or videotape employees engaged in peaceful union or other protected activities.
  • Solicit individual employees to appear in a campaign video.
  • Promulgate, maintain, or enforce work rules that reasonably tend to inhibit employees from exercising their rights under the Act.
  • Deny off-duty employees access to outside nonworking areas of your property, unless business reasons justify it.
  • Prohibit employees from wearing union buttons, t-shirts, and other union insignia unless special circumstances warrant.
  • Convey the message that selecting a union would be futile.
  • Discipline or discharge a union-represented employee for refusing to submit, without a representative, to an investigatory interview the employee reasonably believes may result in discipline.
  • Interview employees to prepare your defense in an unfair labor practice case, unless you provide certain assurances. You must communicate to the employee the purpose of the questioning, assure him against reprisals, and obtain his voluntary participation. Questioning must occur in a context free from employer hostility to union organization and must not itself be coercive. And questioning must not go beyond what is needful to achieve its legitimate purpose. That is, you may not pry into other union matters, elicit information concerning the employee’s subjective state of mind, or otherwise interfere with employee rights under the Act.
  • Initiate, solicit employees to sign, or lend more than minimal support to or approval of a decertification or union-disaffection petition.
  • Discharge, constructively discharge, suspend, layoff, fail to recall from layoff, demote, discipline, or take any other adverse action against employees because of their protected, concerted activities.

After two days of evidentiary hearings, the judge gave both sides an August 6th deadline to present briefs for his consideration.  A decision is not expected until later this year. 

 

Kansas Champion visits El Dorado

On Saturday, June 15th Miss Frontier, Bailey Smith, Miss Teen El Dorado, Naomi Galindo, and Mini Miss Frontier Janessa Knapp joined Miss Augusta Sierra Marie Bonn and Children’s Miracle Network Hospitals’ Kansas Champion Vinny along with “Flat Vinny” to help Walmart raise awareness and funds for Children’s Miracle Network Hospitals (CMNH) in Kansas.

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Back row, left to right, Miss Augusta Sierra Marie Bonn, Miss Teen El Dorado Naomi Galindo, Miss Frontier Bailey Smith. Front row, left to right, Vinny, “Flat Vinny” and Mini Miss Frontier Janessa Knapp.

The month-long fundraising event was celebrated with a kickoff party that included hotdogs, popcorn, cake and a coloring contest.  Vinny was on hand to judge the contest which features a “Flat Vinny” designed by Vinny. His flat version is traveling the state and Internet with the hashtag #flatvinny.  Vinny and his parents will be able to log on and see all the people and places “Flat Vinny” has visited. Each week one drawing will be selected and the winner will receive a Walmart gift card.

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Vinny, with his flat version “Flat Vinny” and Miss Augusta Sierra Marie Bonn.  Sierra has taken “Flat Vinny” across the state with her as she competed for the title of Miss Kansas raising awareness for Children’s Miracle Network Hospitals.

Vinny and the girls will be back at Walmart, again, on Saturday, June 22nd from 12-2p to continue raising awareness and funds.  All funds raised will go to our local CMNH Hospital to help sick and injured kids.

 

Butler County | City & School Elections 2019

In this week’s podcast episode, we spoke to Butler County Clerk Tatum Stafford regarding the filing deadline for the upcoming elections.  

Among the city and school position openings include Mayor for Andover, Augusta, El Dorado, Latham, Leon, and Potwin.  Most notable is the fact that no one has yet filed for the Butler Community College Board of Trustees.  

The Board of Trustees is the governing body of Butler Community College. The Board delegates authority to the President of the college subject to Board approval over all personnel, educational, financial and business matters pertaining to the operation of the college.

See the complete list of City and School Positions